Editing Video on your Cellphone with Adobe Premiere Rush

Many people are now shooting videos on their cellphones to then share on websites and social media. The entire process can be quick, easy, and fun.

What if you want to do some editing to your video, right on your cellphone? Add a title? Delete a section?

That’s where Adobe Premiere Rush comes in!

Bob Evans put together this easy, simple tutorial to get you started. Thanks, Bob!

If you’re just getting started with cellphone videos, here is our how-to on the basics.

Let us know what else you’d like to learn!

Virtual Online Art Lessons with Luke MacNeil and Laura Cenedella 4/4/2020

FREE Virtual Online Art Lessons!

Saturday April 4, 2020

In the morning from 10-1 Luke will present a great walkthrough of how to use Lightroom to enhance your photos. Now is the perfect time to expand your LIghtroom skills! Plus he’ll show you how to use your PC to run a Facebook Live session. It’s a bit trickier than using a cellphone, but Luke has it down to a science. And there’ll be live music, too! Amazing!

Luke will be doing this from his full home studio, which has amazing sound. So be sure to stop in and watch!

From 1-3 talented artist Laura O. Cenedella will do a live painting session, showing you how to paint this nautical scene with oil paints! You’ll get to see her at-home studio and ask questions! It’ll take place on her Facebook page.

Laura’s Supply List:

Supply List:
Paint Colors:
Artist White
Titanium White
Yellow
Yellow Ochre
Red
Ultra Marine Blue
Palette
Drying Medium
Impasto Mediums/ Walnut Oil


Brushes- ( Oil Painting )
1 Inch
1/2 Inch
Round
Flat
Filbert
Rigger


Paper Towels
A Can or Jar for Mineral Spirits
A Palette Knife for Mixing or for Cleaning your Palette
A Bag for Trash
A Drop Cloth
An Easel or Paint Box
Canvas Artist Board
And Anything Else You are Comfortable Using.

Join us for a day of fun and creativity!

Morning Session Location with Luke:

https://www.facebook.com/luke.macnei1

Afternoon Session Location with Laura Cenedella:

https://www.facebook.com/Laura-O-Cenedella-269143975260

Posting a Premiere Video on Facebook

When you post a video on Facebook with a premiere status, what does that mean? How is that different from a standard Facebook video?

These simple how-to instructions will get you on the right path!

First off, you need a video to post. Be sure to read our simple step-by-step instructions on how to shoot a video with your cellphone. It’ll get you started so you can test this out.

Once you have a video file ready, it’s time to learn about the Premiere option in Facebook.

What is a Premiere Video?

The concept of a premiere video is that it “becomes visible” at a specific date and time. Think of it like an award ceremony. Lots of people tune in at 8pm EST at a specific date to see it at its very first showing. They want to all be part of that initial showing. After that, lots of people can re-watch it endlessly. So the video is available long term for those later viewers. It has all the same features as a ‘normal’ video. Its special bonus is that it had the premiere launch when it very first was shown to the public.

You pre-load your premiere video ahead of time. Let’s say a video was going to go live on May 1 at 8pm. I could post the video into the systems on April 28th so everything was set. I could schedule it for a release time of May 1 at 8pm EST. I now have a URL I can send out to everybody letting them know where that premiere is going to be held. That means I can get a lot of publicity for that URL. People going to the URL will see the count-down clock of how long until the video is visible.

This makes it easier for people to all get to the video for its launch.

A Premiere Video lets people chat and talk about the video while it’s playing that first time. It makes the event a community event. And then, after that first playing, the video is available for anybody to watch and rewatch.

In order to set up a premiere video, you need the video to be complete. So be sure to look at our other how-do that talks about how to make the video in the first place.

Posting a Premiere Video on Facebook

Here are the steps for posting a Premiere video. Unlike posting a regular video, which is simply done as a traditional post, there are a few extra steps to putting a video live in premiere status.

First, on a computer, go to your main YouTube page. These examples use the BVAA Facebook fan / business page, but you can do this on a personal page as well. Look for a link for your video area. There might be a word “video” beneath your main banner. It might be hidden under the “more” tab. Different layouts have different options visible. Find that video area.

Once you’re in your video list, click the “…” area to get to the full video library listing.

On your video listing page, you’ll see a summary of all of your videos and their views. Any video you ran initially as a ‘live’ video will have a little video camera icon in its status column. At the top, there should be a link to create a new premiere video.

When you click that link, you’ll get a prompt to select your video on your hard drive. Browse to find your video, and start it loading up. While it is loading, you can edit its details.

On the first of the two tabs, put in a title that has key words so you’re found when people search on your topic. Have it be meaningful at the same time. The description can hold a more complete explanation about your video. Give it a few ‘tags’ – i.e. key words – to help it get found.

You can see in the lower left that this video is still loading.

Click ‘Next’.

This second page sets the premiere start date and time for this video. You can set any future date. YOUR VIDEO WILL TAKE TIME TO LOAD. Don’t try to do this at the last minute with only 10 minutes to spare. It could easily take the video a half hour to load in and then another 10 minutes after that for internal processing. Load your video up at least two hours ahead of time, to be ready for the premiere. This gives you time to publicize that the launch is coming.

You can set a featured image to go with your premiere, if you want. If that’s tricky for you to figure out, don’t worry about that. You don’t need it. I just used a screenshot from the video.

You can ‘scroll down’ in both the left-hand and right-hand areas.

This area is ALL OPTIONAL. If you want to make playlists to organize your videos into groupings, you can do that. You don’t have to. If you want to cross-promote this video on other pages you run, you can do that, too. You don’t have to. All you need to set is that top-area date and time.

When you’re ready with these details, click PUBLISH in the bottom right.

Your video will continue loading and then processing until it is ready.

You’ll see an entry show up on your video listing, showing this video as preparing to be posted in a premiere state. In the status area there will be a “clapboard” showing this is a scheduled premiere event. If you point your mouse at that clapboard icon, a helpful note will show up saying “Scheduled premiere”.

When the video is processed and fully in the Facebook system, Facebook will make a promotional post for you, touting this upcoming premiere of your new video. It’ll have the launch date in red beneath the image you chose to represent your video. It’ll show your description and title. It’ll encourage people to come watch the video during this special premiere period.

This right here is a key benefit of the premiere system. You now have a promotional post you can share, share, share with family and friends. They can share it for you. This promotion can be seen by thousands of people. Everyone will be reminded by Facebook it’s coming up, encouraged to attend, etc. etc. It becomes an “event”. People know exactly where to go to see the video at that launch date and time.

Note that the text under the image says “Tune in to watch live”. That’s a bit confusing, and both YouTube and Facebook have this same issue. The video is NOT LIVE in the sense of the artist being there, live, doing the actions. It is a pre-recorded video. I suppose the viewer is watching the premiere “live” as it premieres, but that is a confusing way of expressing it. Just know, as an artist, that you are NOT live in this situation. This is a pre-recorded video you posted and is all set. The only component of this that you do live is that you can chat live with guests in the comment area while the video is running on this very first premiere launch.

When the premiere starts, every link to the video now changes to have a watch live button. The screen area itself says that the premiere is live. Again, to clarify, YOU ARE NOT LIVE. The video is running. I know it’s confusing.

This is the view from someone watching the video. It says in the top area that this is a PREMIERE. Note that there is no sense at all of how long this premiere is going to last. So it’s a good idea to mention to people how long this is going to go on for.

People can comment while the premiere is running. All of those comments are saved with the video, so people watching later can see them.

This premiere was run on the BVAA page. I shared it to my personal Lisa Shea page to let family and friends know it was going on. Here is the post on the Lisa Shea page. Note how it also lets people the video is now in its premiere state and can be watched.

This is further in the premiere process. The turtle is still being painted. You can see the comments being made on the right-hand side. It still says in that top left area that this is a PREMIERE.

Then the video ends. It just stops. It doesn’t “tell you” the video is done. The PREMIERE red alert in the top left goes away, but that’s it. So it’s good to have something in your video itself saying goodbye or such.

Now that the PREMIERE aspect of this video is done, the video acts like any other video in your library. There’s now a post in your timeline about this video including all the comments made during that premiere session.

If you go to the videos associated with the BVAA account, this video is now simply one of those videos, available for watching.

Ask with any questions.

Be sure to also read about how to post your video as a Premiere video on YouTube. It’s good to have your video in both systems, to reach both audiences.

As a note, there is video editing software created by Adobe called Adobe Premiere. That is wholly separate from the concept that YouTube and Facebook have of “launching a video as a premiere”. They just happen to be the same name.

Posting a Premiere Video on YouTube

Having a YouTube Premiere Video brings lots of benefits and views to your video.

Just what is a YouTube Premiere Video, and how do you load one up?

First, be sure to read our how-to write-up on how to make a video in the first place. That way you have the video complete and are prepared to share that video with your audience. This how-to is a very simple, basic one using your cellphone. No special software or editing needed.

Now that your video is recorded, it’s time to post it. Sure, you can simply just post it live on YouTube. But, instead, consider posting it as a premiere video. That gives you added benefit.

What is a Premiere Video?

The concept of a premiere video is that it “becomes visible” at a specific date and time. Think of it like an award ceremony. Lots of people tune in at 8pm EST at a specific date to see it at its very first showing. They want to all be part of that initial showing. After that, lots of people can re-watch it endlessly. So the video is available long term for those later viewers. It has all the same features as a ‘normal’ video. Its special bonus is that it had the premiere launch when it very first was shown to the public.

You pre-load your premiere video ahead of time. Let’s say a video was going to go live on May 1 at 8pm. I could post the video into the systems on April 28th so everything was set. I could schedule it for a release time of May 1 at 8pm EST. I now have a URL I can send out to everybody letting them know where that premiere is going to be held. That means I can get a lot of publicity for that URL. People going to the URL will see the count-down clock of how long until the video is visible.

This makes it easier for people to all get to the video for its launch.

A Premiere Video lets people chat and talk about the video while it’s playing that first time. It makes the event a community event. And then, after that first playing, the video is available for anybody to watch and rewatch.

In order to set up a premiere video, you need the video to be complete. So be sure to look at our other how-do that talks about how to make the video in the first place.

Posting a Premiere Video on YouTube

YOU CAN ONLY POST A YOUTUBE PREMIERE FROM YOUR COMPUTER. That’s it. I tried both the normal YouTube phone app as well as the specialized YouTube Studio phone app. Neither allow a premiere. I also checked the online documentation. So you must use your computer to load up a premiere.

You can still SHOOT your video on your cellphone. You then need to move the video onto your PC to actually load it onto YouTube, to be able to use the premiere option.

We’ll have separate instructions on how to get your video onto your computer, if you need help with that. There will also be separate instructions if you want to edit your video. This walkthrough is simply about how to get that video live into YouTube as a premiere.

On your computer, go to YouTube.com. Log into your YouTube account.

Once you’re logged in, you should see a video camera silhouette in the top right.

When you click that icon, you’ll get two options. Choose the Upload Video option.

You are now instructed to browse to find your video on your hard drive. Click to browse around. Figure out where you put your video, and click on it to select it.

Your video will start loading.

While the video is loading, you can set all the details for this video. You don’t have to wait.

For beginners, the only two things on this first tab are the title and description. Use a title full of key words people would search on. This is how people will find your video. At the same time, have it make sense as a title. Have your description be useful and descriptive.

Click Next.

You can skip this entire second tab. You can worry about that sort of thing later on. For now, skip it.

Click Next.

The third tab is where you set the scheduled launch date for your premiere. Note that once you save this you CANNOT CHANGE IT while it is loading. Loading can take a fair amount of time. A 20 minute video can take 25-30 minutes to load up. So give yourself some leeway in setting your premiere time. Don’t set it to be 15 minutes from now. Plan ahead.

I’ll note that after the loading stage comes the processing stage. If a video takes 30 minutes to load in, it can then take another 10 minutes to process before it’s available. You *can* edit the video values, including its premiere time, once it’s in the processing stage.

So again, to make this a premiere, choose the “schedule” radio button, put in a future time, and click the “Set as Premiere” button.

Then press SCHEDULE.

You’ll get a confirmation that everything is loading up. Leave this window open while the loading process goes through its stages. You can close the little white “Video Uploading” alert. Just be sure to leave that main browser window with YouTube open.

Visitors who go to your channel, or who get alerts from you with the destination URL, will see a special type of page that says the video is coming soon. They get a countdown once the time is within two minutes. All of this makes it easy to “congregate” people at the video all at the same time. If you look at the bottom of this video it says “Premieres in 60 seconds”.

Here is the 2 minute countdown window. It is all done automatically, with music. This starts when the premiere time is reached.

On the right hand side, people can chat and make comments while the premiere is playing. When this first premiere run is complete, the video is then available like all other videos on YouTube for repeat watching. When people watch the video later on, they’ll be able to see those special comments that were made on the very first premiere of the video.

Here is what it looks like while it is playing in premiere mode. Note that when you point at the video, while it’s playing it SAYS it is live. But it is NOT LIVE. It is pre-recorded.

So, to be clear, THIS IS NOT A LIVE VIDEO. This video was not broadcast live. The video was made at the artist’s leisure. The artist got to play with the video until it was just right. When the video was ready, the artist then loaded that video into YouTube as a Premiere video. That gives this special method of putting the video live, in a way which draws more interest and which people can “enjoy together”.

Interestingly, as you watch this in its first premiere playing, watchers have NO idea of how much longer the video is going to run. There is no “end time” shown. So it’s a good idea to let people know in the description or something so they know how long this is going to go.

Here is the video now that the premiere is over. It indicates when that premiere first happened. It also lets you “re-watch” the appearance of the premiere conversation on the right hand side, if you want. The comments appear in the window right at the time (during the video) that they were initially typed in. So they make sense in context. You can hide that conversation, too, if you’d rather just watch the video.

Ask with any questions!

As a note, there is video editing software created by Adobe called Adobe Premiere. That is wholly separate from the concept that YouTube and Facebook have of “launching a video as a premiere”. They just happen to be the same name.

Here’s how to do the same premiere style event on Facebook –

If you need help with just the very first basic steps of recording a cellphone video, here you go:

Recording an Artist Video with Android Cellphone

Many artists are experimenting with how to record videos of themselves creating art, using their Android cellphone. Here are instructions on how to do this. This how-do is for the very basics of how to record the video using a cellphone. We’ll have separate how-tos on using webcams, on editing, how to post a premiere video, how to stream video live, and so on.

For this example, you are recording the video wholly off-line (not live). This means you can re-do the video as many times as you want until you have a result you’re happy with. Only then do you post that video for people to view.

Step 1: Setting Up the Area

People who watch this video will want to be able to see what you are doing. There are two main formats people tend to use. One, used by Libia Goncalves with her how-to videos, involves the cellphone on a tripod, looking “over the artist shoulder”.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqfuyZLE2QyrTo8Bs8HtaPA

Similarly, Lisa uses this for her BVAA workshop videos:

https://www.facebook.com/BVArtAssoc/

In comparison, there is the “across the room” layout, which shows the entire artist plus their easel with their artwork. This is the layout Laura Cenedella uses:

https://www.facebook.com/Laura-O-Cenedella-269143975260

All of these were done with cellphones. It’s just a cellphone on a tripod. Different layout options are useful for different reasons. A close-up focuses just on the artwork. A “Bob Ross” style artist view lets the artist discuss ideas more clearly with the audience.

You’ll note that all three are oriented HORIZONTALLY. Always orient your video horizontally to be best suited to all viewing modes – TVs, computer monitors, and cell phones.

Here’s the cellphone-specific tripod Lisa is using:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07NWC3L95/

It is incredibly easy to use and adjust. You just stick the cellphone into the top grippy arms and it’s set. It can telescope and angle. I use this for my computer webcam, too, so I can shoot videos of me painting at my desk.

Play with the lighting on your scene. Add extra lights to make it visible, if you need to. Do tests to see if the viewer can see the artwork clearly.

Bob Evans says: “Good lighting is important, doesn’t need to be anything fancy, some DIY clip on lights will work well, especially if bounced of a piece of white foam core board.”

Step 2: Making the Recording

On your Android phone, it’s easy to record a video. Just click on your normal camera icon to open up your camera. Here is me pointing my Samsung Galaxy S7 at my watercolor tray.

See how there is the big white “take a picture” button at the right? Below that is a red dot. That red dot is your START button to record a video. Try it. Just click that red dot and record a short video of anything at all.

That’s all it takes to record a video. Open your camera app. Hit the red button. Press again to stop the video.

Bob Evans says: “For iPhone it’s basically the same, tap on ‘camera’ swipe to select video and push the red button, push again to stop.”

Practice a few times. Record short videos. You can delete them. See how it works.

Once you get the hang of making a short video, try making a video of you doing something art-related. You don’t need a tripod. You can just wedge your cellphone on a shelf or duct tape it or rubber band it to something. See how it works. Experiment. You can delete the videos. It doesn’t matter.

Step 3: Posting A Video

OK you’ve practiced, and experimented, and you’ve ended up with a 2-minute video of you painting a cloud. We would love to see your video! The more we all share with each other, the more we learn new techniques.

Here are a few ideas for posting your video.

YouTube: This is enormously popular and doesn’t require a logon to watch. Create an account at YouTube.com. The upload button will be at the top right of the screen and looks like a video camera. YouTube is all about videos – that is what they do. Just click that upload button, give your video a title, and let us know when it’s live.

Facebook: Facebook does require a Facebook account to watch these videos, but the traffic on Facebook is phenomenal. Even if you post on YouTube, it’s good to also post your video on Facebook. The built-in sharing and publicity for videos here is fairly phenomenal. Even if you hate Facebook personally, consider creating a fan page here solely for use of promoting videos. To post a video on Facebook, just do your normal post typing, and click the ‘video’ button to attach a video to your post.

BVAA: If you have no interest of having yourself anywhere on line, let us know. We can post your videos to our BVAA pages. That way you don’t have to be online at all. We’ll get it live for you.

Step 4: Ask for Feedback!

We are all learning and experimenting here. We’re all trying different lighting angles, different camera angles, different layouts, and more. Ask members for suggestions. Watch other members’ videos and see what they’re trying.

The more we all help each other out, the more we all thrive!

Here are a few links to BVAA members’ cellphone videos, to see how these work:

Laura O. Cenedella:

https://www.facebook.com/Laura-O-Cenedella-269143975260

Libia Goncalves:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqfuyZLE2QyrTo8Bs8HtaPA

Let us know if you are doing videos with a cellphone, so we can share your links! We’ll have additional articles which go into more advanced topics once you get the hang of simply making and posting a video.

For example, once you have a video, here is how to load it onto YouTube as a special Premiere Video Event, to get it more viewers.

You should also load it onto Facebook, to reach that audience:

Virtual Online Art Lessons with Luke MacNeil and Laura Cenedella 3/28/2020

FREE Virtual Online Art Lessons!

Saturday March 28, 2020

In the morning from 10-1 Luke MacNeil will be available for everything you’ve always wanted to know about Lightroom. It’s wholly free. Join us on Facebook to watch him live and chime in with what you want to learn about!

From 1-3 talented artist Laura O. Cenedella will do a live painting session, showing you how to paint this beautiful scene with oil paints! You’ll get to see her at-home studio and ask questions! It’ll take place on her Facebook page.

Supply List:

Paint Colors:
Artist White
Titanium
White
Yellow
Yellow Ochre
Red
Ultra Marine
Blue

Palette
Impasto Mediums/ Walnut Oil
Drying Medium
Mineral Spirits

Brushes- ( Oil Painting )
1 Inch
1/2 Inch
Round
Flat
Filbert
Rigger

Paper Towels
A Can or Jar for Mineral Spirits
A Palette Knife for Mixing or for Cleaning your Palette
A Bag for Trash
A Drop Cloth
An Easel or Paint Box
Canvas Artist Board

And Anything Else You are Comfortable Using.

Join us for a day of fun and creativity!

Luke MacNeil 10-1 –

https://www.facebook.com/luke.macnei1

Laura O. Cenedella 1-3 –

https://www.facebook.com/Laura-O-Cenedella-269143975260/

Beautiful Castle Watercolor Painting Project for All Ages

Perfect for all ages! A delightful beginning watercolor project, “Beautiful Castle” teaches students about resist crayon, drawing lines, and handling adjacent colors.

Supplies:
a piece of watercolor paper
watercolors
a brush
a ruler
water

You can paint your castle in any colors you wish. If you want to match the shown image, Libia uses these colors: yellow, blue, red, and burnt sienna.

Visit DColorEx.com for a printable download of this Beautiful Castle, to use as a model.

Libia is available for online lessons both in group format and in one-on-one instruction. Perfect for aspiring students of all ages. A delightful way for students to expand their creativity and artistic expression even when unable to get out to an art studio!

Beautiful Blackstone Valley Art Show Reception – Fri Mar 20 2020 5-7pm

Drone photography by Bob Evans

This is a virtual presentation of the “Blackstone Valley” themed art show, coordinated by the Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor and the Blackstone Valley Art Association. It was showcased in the Linwood Mill Complex in Whitinsville, Massachusetts in March 2020.

Artists featured are:

James Hunt / Dock, Blackstone Canal Fall 2016 $350
Bonnie Frederico / Swan in Flight $750
Linda Nelson / Millbury Bike Path $60
Linda Nelson / Slater Mill $60
Beverly Tinklenberg / Casualty of the Blackstone $250
Carol Frieswick / A Fallen Treasure $125
Carol Frieswick / Blackstone Marsh $125
Carol Frieswick / Birding House $125
Carol Frieswick / Plummer’s Landing $125
Bob Evans / Millville Lock $50
Bob Evans / Blackstone River and Mount Wachusett $50
Brandi Van Roo / Village Congregational Church $40
Lisa Shea / Sutton Sunset $30
Libia Goncalves / Fun at River Bend Farm $60
Bob See / Sutton Gazebo $60

Contact us for information about buying originals or prints of these artworks.

Here’s the online party on YouTube:

Mon Mar 16 2020 – Share Your Art!

It’s Monday March 16, 2020! The Coronavirus is impeding the ability of some to share artwork in a communal space.

We’d love to see what you’ve been making at home!

Just leave a comment to this post and let us know what you’re working on. Share a note about your work-in-progress! To let us see photos, share a link to your Instagram page or wherever else you’re posting images!

We’d love to cheer you on!